How to Build a Rain Catchment System

How to Build a Rain Catchment System

Hoping for rain in a drought? Take advantage of the rain when it comes by building a rain catchment system. Rain catchment systems are an effective way to collect water from your roof or yard and store it until you need it. They can also be used to irrigate plants, wash cars, and more! In this article, we will teach you how to build a rain catchment system that can be put together in under 2 hours with materials found at any hardware or home improvement store.

What is Rainwater Harvesting??

Harvesting rainwater is a great way to collect water in an environmentally conscious manner. Water that falls on rooftops, parking areas, open land, or other surfaces can be collected and stored for later use. When this happens the rain doesn’t contribute to surface runoff which helps keep our waterways clean. By harvesting rainwater you are putting it to use by using it as a source for water instead of letting it become runoff.

Why is rainwater harvesting important?

Rainwater harvesting is important for several reasons. The first being that rainwater can be collected instead of letting it become runoff which helps keep our waterways clean. By collecting the rain water you are putting it to use by using it as a source for your garden instead of having it run down storm drains through gutters and into sewers or septic systems. This reduces strain on wastewater treatment facilities, in addition to conserving drinking supply during droughts when sources like lakes might need to be drawn upon!

Using Rain Water in Gardens/Plants:

Due to their chemical composition, rooftops tend not have minerals or chemicals found in tap water which make them ideal for watering gardens because they aren’t loaded with salts, calcium carbonate, and other chemicals that can build up in a soil. To use rainwater to water plants simply place containers under downspouts or direct the runoff from gutters into buckets, barrels, or tanks for later use!

Using Rain Water Around the House:

Rain catchments systems are an effective way to collect water from your roof or yard and store it until you need it. They can also be used to irrigate plants, wash cars, and more! In this article we will teach you how to build a simple home rainwater harvesting system that can be put together in under two hours with materials found at any hardware or home improvement store. Here’s what you’ll need: One 55 gallon drum (or multiple smaller drums) Rope or some type of cordage Large container to catch rainwater for storage (Optional) Rain Barrel Diverter Kit Hose

Is rainwater safe?

Yes! Rainwater is generally safe to use. Since it doesn’t contain chlorine, fluoride or any other chemicals found in tap water you can be sure that rainwater won’t have the same chemical composition as drinking water so it’s perfectly acceptable for watering plants and cleaning outdoor surfaces without worrying about skin irritation or rashes caused by exposure to toxic materials.

How Much Rainwater Can You Collect?

If you live in a region that receives abundant rain like the Pacific Northwest, Central Florida, South Carolina or any other area where it rains often during summer months turning your roof into an effective harvesting system is easy! The average rainwater collection barrel holds around 55 gallons. If you have multiple barrels connected together via hose and spigot (like in our example) then you can easily harvest over 100 gallons of water per downpour when using gutters to collect runoff from larger areas like rooftops, parking lots etc…

What Are The Different Methods To Collect Rainwater?

There are a few different methods and systems for harvesting rainwater. Some of the most common include:

  • Using gutters to collect runoff from rooftops, parking areas, open land etc…
  • Building rain catchments (rain barrels) that can be placed under downspouts or in storage tanks indoors
  • Using cisterns which is basically any tank used for collection/storage of water such as above-ground pool covers or other types of functional but non-traditional containers like big plastic trash cans!

The possibilities are endless when it comes to creating your own system so find whatever works best for you!

Before you Start

If you plan on collecting rainwater you should consult the local government for permission. Yes, it’s illegal to collect rainwater in certain places!

Choose Your Location

Where you choose to put your rainwater collection system is going to depend on your personal preference and availability of space.

It’s important to consider what type of rainwater collection you want to create before purchasing materials. Here are some options to consider:

  • Cisterns
  • Rain Barrels
  • Rain Catchments (Tanks)
  • Rain Barrels and Cisterns Rain

Barrels are great for catching rainwater from large areas like roofs, parking lots, and open areas. They’re perfect for those who don’t have space to install a larger collection system like a cistern or tank.

To install a rain barrel simply cut the downspout off your downspout, drill a hole in the side of the barrel, and insert the downspout into the barrel.  Most people like to use 55-gallon drums for their rain barrels so you can easily use multiple barrels if you have more space available.

If you’re using a cistern then the installation process is similar. You’ll want to make sure that the rainwater collection system is not over or under your roof so that water doesn’t seep into or out of the ground.

How to Build a Rain Catchment System Using Gutters:

You can build a rain catchment system with gutters. It’s easy to do and costs very little (usually less than $5 for materials and some time). To build one of these systems simply follow these simple steps:

  1. The first step is to determine the size of your gutters. If you live in an area with heavy rainfall, you’ll need large gutters to catch the water and divert it into your rain barrel. If you live in an area with light rainfall you might want to consider installing smaller gutters so that only a small amount of rainwater flows to your rain barrel each time it rains. This can help prevent leaks in the gutters that can waste your precious rainwater!
  2. Gutter guards are available at any home improvement store and are inexpensive so be sure to purchase them before starting. They’re helpful because they keep leaves from getting clogged in the gutter and prevent them from blocking the flow of water into the gutter which is important if you live in an area where it snows.
  3. Next, cut a piece of plywood or similar material that is 3″ x 8′ (or bigger) so that you have plenty of space for your catchment.
  4. Attach the gutters to the downspouts and attach the rain barrel or container to the gutters. If you choose to use a large plastic trash can as a rain barrel then make sure that you’ve used a sturdy base for it.
  5. When collecting rainwater there are 2 main problems you should be concerned about. First, you want to be able to collect as much water as possible, and second, you want to be able to drain the water from your rain barrel or catchment. The easiest way to do this is to have two hose bibs attached to your rain barrel which means that you can drain your catchment into the garden hose bib whenever you’re ready.
  6. If you’d like you can also connect two rain barrels together with a hose and spigot so that you can water multiple areas at once.

“Dry” System

This system is a variation of a rain barrel set-up. But it involves a larger storage volume. After the first rain event, the collection pipe dries up, which allows for the second rain event. The next time it rains, water flows into the top of the tank through the collection pipe and is transferred to the water garden.

A rain barrel is good for storing water during periods of heavy rainfall. It can also be used for catching or recycling storm water runoff.

Rainfall in these areas occurs over a longer period, and is generally associated with larger storms.

You need to have the storage tank right next to your house.

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